Mondays, for me, are like a fresh new page ... a new start ... the beginning of a whole week to make things, put ideas into play ... dream up new ones ... and make new stock to replace the weekend's market sales. I feel particularly fortunate to never start the week with "Monday Blues" as this time is always a promise of new opportunities and potentials.

Yesterday was very fruitful for Gilmour Design at the Port Douglas Market with two significant mid-range bowl forms heading out into the world ... along with a raft of utensils, salad servers and a small resin bowl.

bowl form in plantation-grown pine by bob gilmour, australia

I had made a series of shallow forms in Queensland-grown plantation Pinus radiata (pine) a while back and a couple of smaller pieces went off to find new homes earlier in the year. Yesterday, the largest of the elongated shallow bowl / platter forms attracted a new custodian and is off to Sydney.

large platter form and two side dishes in plantation-grown pine by bob gilmour, australia

Kiln dried P. radiata, despite comments such as "oh, it's just a bit of old radiata pine", is wonderful to work with. It's easy to shape, stable and finishes up really nicely. Depending on the grain lines of a particular piece of wood, works in radiata have a very Scandinavian flavour ... adding a timeless elegance to designs.

large platter form close-up view in plantation-grown pine by bob gilmour, australia

The other significant piece of work to find a new home was a large flat bowl piece I created in White Bean just a few months ago. It was over 60 cm long, light in colour, with some natural edge and nice markings.

large flat bowl form in White Bean by bob gilmour, australia

The wood for this piece was purchased from salvage stock of a private forestry operation near Ravenshoe on the Atherton Tablelands. The logging contractor, who I knew, was selectively felling trees on a near vertical mountain slope and winching the logs to the top with heavy machinery. I was fortunate to be able to salvage some wood of various species, some of which never ever show up in commercial timber markets. They had called this wood "White Bean" although I'm pretty sure it was actually a piece of very wide sapwood from a large Blackbean tree ... so, I thought it was pretty interesting that I had something that was both black and white at the same time.

side view - large flat bowl form in White Bean by bob gilmour, australia

This piece is now on its way to Sydney.

shallow bowl form in White Bean by bob gilmour, australia

Gilmour Design on Facebook